ALBUM REVIEW: Kate Tempest – Let Them Eat Chaos | NARC. | Reliably Informed | Music and Creative Arts News for Newcastle and the North East

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Fiction Records

Released: 07.10.16

www.katetempest.co.uk

 

 

 

 

Kate Tempest is a brewing tornado of brutality and unnerving truth, turbulent in themes yet electrifying in her gritty storytelling. An established poet, playwright and novelist, Kate’s offerings tend to be in the sickening silhouettes of a torn society, a compilation of South London squeezed into 13 palpable tracks on her newest release Let The Chaos In, strained and frustrated, yet utterly mesmerising.

The LP’s tracks are centrally focused around the time of 4:18am, depicting several lifestyles around this time on each song, allowing us a peek into the concerning stereotypes we nowadays refer to as normality.

Picture A Vacuum seeps in gradually, her inviting drawl temperamentally flowing into a contorted lullaby before she ricochets into a fizzing lunacy, screeching about the shameless murder of the Earth. Painting the world we live in with a tarnished and sleazy brush, and certainly colouring outside of the lines, her tales of drug abuse, promiscuity and homelessness are hard-hitting.

Lionmouth Door Knocker communicates the gritty reality of life in England’s suburbs, while Ketamine For Breakfast perpetrates the most sinister of undertones over a skittery beat. “We die so others can be born, and we age so others can be young”, she stresses over a monotonous clang, surmising an alternative viewpoint to death and tragedy, in a hopeful light that is somewhat flickering. Stand out track Don’t Fall In is underpinned by a pulsing electronic beat, with Tempest spitting over the boredom of the everyday with such pent-up fury and confusion that it is almost agitating.

The calming and breezy ambience of Pictures On A Screen allows a pause for melancholic reflection, her voice soft and solemn, before regaining its undeniable power in Perfect Coffee, which condemns the Big Smoke’s transparency of the rich over a galactic Pacman-esque beat, and gives a punchy summarisation of how the other half live.

Kate Tempest is a force to be reckoned with, and her latest release will cement her as one of the most vital artists around right now.

 

 

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